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Tuscarawas News Detail

CEPH Accepts College into Accreditation Process

Posted Nov. 1, 2012

The Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) has approved Kent State to begin its accreditation process, a significant milestone for the three-year old College of Public Health.  CEPH is an independent agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit schools of public health and public health programs.
 
In announcing the news, Dean Sonia Alemagno said, “We are excited about this next step in our development.  Our application is the culmination of years of hard work aimed at creating an attractive educational and research environment for top students and world-class faculty,” she added.
 
“Our relationships with area hospitals, such as the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic, health departments, policy advocacy groups and other public health organizations have enabled us to offer students and faculty a rich and diverse ‘real-world’ perspective,” Alemagno continued.  “In addition, by leveraging the university’s campuses and programs in Switzerland, China and India and throughout Latin America, we have successfully secured educational and research opportunities for students and faculty interested in global health.”
 
Dr. Todd A. Diacon, Kent State provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs, recognizes the importance of the achievement by the college.  “This is a significant milestone for the college to attain in such a short period of time,” Diacon observes.  “It can take schools of public health up to 10 years from their founding to become accredited by CEPH.  Kent State is on track to conclude the process in around five years, and I’m confident that the college will meet the accreditation standards,” he says.  “The CEPH imprimatur assures students of quality in public health education, combining educational excellence with applicability to the world of public health practice,” Diacon concludes.
 
Alemagno will be leading the college’s accreditation process activities, which will take approximately two years.  Next steps for Kent State will be to attend an accreditation orientation workshop and conduct an in-depth analytical self-study, which is considered the core of the evaluation process.  Involvement of all constituent groups is deemed essential, including institutional officers, administrative staff, faculty, students, alumni and community constituents (e.g., staff members from agencies which partner with the school in education, research and service).
 
A three-day on-site visit by a team of four peer reviewers will follow to confirm the validity of the self-study document and form the basis for the accreditation decision.  Senior academicians with administrative experience, as well as senior public health practitioners, will compose the accreditation team.
 
By virtue of accreditation-process acceptance, Kent State was welcomed as a new associate member school in the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), the national organization representing accredited schools of public health.  There are 50 member schools and eight with associate status like Kent State.